Monthly Archives: February 2012

Mad About Monday – New Shoes!

Last week I went to the running store here in KC and finally bought a pair of shoes that were appropriate for my feet. I’ve known for years that I should be doing this, but never quite: a) found the time, b) wanted to spend the money.

The shoes I was wearing were, of course, exactly the wrong kind … I pronated in a totally different direction than the shoe; oops! What a difference a decision to listen makes! My feet don’t ache and either do my quads; all because I’m now properly pronated … or unpronated … something!

Listening doesn’t just make sense in regard to buying good shoes; it’s a good idea to listen to what your body is trying to tell you about the choices you’re making, from food to shoes, supplements to mattresses.

Some people are really good at listening and others aren’t. This is where a Certified Health Coach comes in. We are trained to hear what your body is saying. If you ache, don’t sleep well, can’t seem to lose weight and/or are suffering from allergies, a chronic disease, fibromyalgia or fatigue, and can’t seem to find relief, consider hiring a Health Coach. We can help!

For more information, visit my website at http://www.HealthWorksKC.com.

Thanks Thursday – Cod & Veggie Soup

Okay, just to be honest, that doesn’t even sound good to me, but … I am going low-carb for a while and since I don’t eat much meat or soy my protein choices are limited. I wasn’t looking forward to this breakfast. I’ve made it before, and not loved it, but this time I was working at home and put it on to simmer slowly so I could get a project completed.  It was fantastic! The key has to be the slow simmer. The fishy flavor from previous quick cooking attempts was gone and in its place was a rich, totally un-fishy broth … delicious!

Whether for lunch or dinner you have got to try this out for yourself. Here’s the recipe:

  • 4 oz. cod (mine was frozen in 4 oz. portions)
  • 1 1/3 c vegetable broth
  • 1/2  c frozen broccoli florets *optional
  • 1/3 c chopped greens *optional

I use a combo of Edward and Sons Low Sodium UnChicken and unBeef bouillon. Each cube makes 2 cups so I make 4 cups, divvy it up 3 ways and store it in the fridge or freezer.

Put broth and cod in small pot, I used a low heat and it simmered for close to an hour. I added the broccoli florets in the last 15 minutes. I often add greens, today I didn’t.

I apologize for no picture … I really didn’t expect to be writing about it!

Wednesday’s Word – Ripple

We hear a lot about finding our purpose. I always found that really frustrating, mainly because I had no idea what my purpose was. Sure, some people are truly drawn to their purpose early on (think Oprah), but most people don’t have a clue.

Then I began to wonder if even those who think they know their purpose truly do … How can anyone, really? Jimmy Stewart’s character in “It’s a Wonderful Life” didn’t have a clue how the world would be changed without him. That’s true for each of us and it got me thinking about the ripple effect of human action or inaction and how each one impacts the universe.

If we tried to think of the effect of each choice, from turning on the water to wash our face to our decision about whether or not to have children, we’d not get out of bed, but we could, just for a moment, think about how some things ripple.

Simple things like plumbing and soap have a ripple effect. Consider the elements required to make the soap, the pipes and connections and the systems required to bring the water into your house. Each piece has people and resources attached to it: chemists, engineers, salespeople, factory workers, miners, advertising execs and graphic designers, actors to sell the soap in commercials, cameramen, distributors, delivery drivers, shippers, shelf stockers, store managers, customer service workers, cashiers, and waste treatment and garbage on the back side … and the equipment everyone uses and the energy required … all so that you can get up and wash your face.

Each action; infinite ripples …

So, that purpose everyone tells us to figure out is almost impossible because without a Jimmy Stewart moment, there’s no way for us to see the impact of each choice. However, as responsible, thinking adults, we can try to envision the impact of some of our choices:

If we choose to eat plant based food that is organic, untreated with pesticides or chemical fertilizers, then we might just save a family farmer, or reduce the cancer incidence due to the carcinogens found in those chemicals, reducing healthcare costs and increasing productivity. The farm workers who pick the crops will be healthier and so will their children because they won’t return home with pesticides on their hands and clothing … one of the people impacted might give birth to a Nobel Prize winner … ripples.

Trivia Tuesday – Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are the trendy cruciferous veggie and that’s a good thing for health. They are the highest ranking vegetable in glucosinolates, the biggie when it comes to cancer prevention by supporting the body’s natural detox system. The smell when you overcook them is from sulfur-containing nutrients, necessary to detox, along with a multitude of antioxidants also present in Brussels sprouts.

Researchers are finding so many diseases that are a direct result of inflammation.
Alzheimer’s, asthma, arthritis, cardiovascular, irritable bowel, Crohn’s, insulin resistance, fibromyalgia … all have an inflammatory component. Adding Brussels sprouts to your diet
is one more example of food as medicine.Glucosinolates, Vitamin K and the ALA from
Omega3’s make Brussels sprouts a powerful anti-inflammatory.  100 calories (about 1 ½
cups) of Brussels sprouts contains 430mg of ALA … more than a third of the daily recommended intake.x, along with a multitude of antioxidants also present in Brussels sprouts.

To get the most healthful benefits from Brussels sprouts, cut them in quarters and steam for 5-8 minutes. My favorite recipe isn’t the best use, but definitely the tastiest:

1.5 pounds Brussels sprouts (wash, cut off bottom and remove yellowed leaves)
2T olive oil
1/4t cinnamon
sea salt

Preheat oven to 400. After cleaning sprouts, toss with olive oil, sprinkle and toss again with cinnamon and salt. Put on baking sheet (I use a jelly roll pan) and put in oven for 35-40 minutes. I set the timer in ten minute increments and roll them around so that they brown evenly. YUM!

Thanks to www.whfoods.com for their fantastic information! And don’t forget to visit my website at www.HealthWorksKC.com for information about events and coaching opportunities.

Thankful Thursday – God’s Gifts

I am thankful for my dog Lena. She was a gift from God. I took her out of a breeder’s kennel when she was one-year old. They told me she knew her name and ‘no’ but she didn’t know either of those things. She’d never had a treat; didn’t know what to do with it when we stopped at a rest stop on the way home. She learned quickly.

She slept by my side after my husband died. She would run for the other end of the house when I sneezed. She knew, from anywhere in the house if I shed a tear and came to sit in my lap.

She loved to control the food dish and only when she gave him the signal was Mikey the Wonder Dog allowed to eat. I could never discern the signal.

She would use food to control where Mike could go in the house, dropping little pieces around my chair so he couldn’t come by the mommy or across the entryway between living and dining rooms so he was stuck on whatever side we weren’t on. I’d hear him whining and see him squirming out of the corner of my eye, look down, and sure enough there was a little line of about eight kibbles between us while Lena was laying on her side watching his every move looking nonchalant … yeah … right.

For the last year she has gone for walks by riding in a stroller. Her arthritis prevented her from walking more than half a block. She truly thought she was the Queen Bee, sitting up, ears perked forward, watching everything and everyone. People smiled big when they saw Princess Lena in her carriage.

Lena left us today. I am thankful for her loving presence for the last 12 ½ years. She was my snuggle-bucket and my favorite bundle o’ hairs. She has been released from pain and is joyfully nipping at the backs of Jimmy O’s knees.

I love you, eenie. Thank you, God, for the gift of my Lena.

Wednesday Word – Pizziatore

It’s a brand new word!

Here’s the scoop: I had two portions of extra pizza sauce in my freezer, so I decided to make Chicken Pizziatore. One of my favorite dishes made by my mom was Chicken Cacciatore. It required several ingredients, chopped, sautéed, combined and cooked for hours. My version is crazy simple but tastes like I slaved in the kitchen for hours … It’s that good! Here’s the recipe

2 Split Campo Lindo Farms* Chicken Breasts
1.25c Pizza Sauce (leftover or new)

Put all of the ingredients (I know it’s a ton of ingredients to keep track of, but try) in a CrockPot, set to high and cook for 4 hours or until cooked through.

I recommend serving it over whole grain pasta with a green salad as a side. Seriously delicious!

*Campo Lindo Farms is local. They let their chickens roam the pastures and do chicken things. They also slaughter on their premises saving the chickens a frightening, horrific transport to a poorly managed slaughterhouse. They have respect for the animals they raise. It is the only chicken I eat and is available at Whole Foods and a few other grocery stores in Kansas City.

Tidbit Tuesday – Chia Seeds

Wow! These little, bitty seeds pack a wallop! 1oz. (1T + 1/2t) has 8.6g fat, 4.4g protein (high quality containing all essential amino acids except for taurine), 12g carbohydrate, 11g fiber; 1620mg Omega6, 4915mg Omega3, 18% DV of calcium and it’s also high in phosphorous, and manganese. Chia also contains zinc, potassium, copper, niacin, folic acid and magnesium.

All that nutrition is packed into a tiny seed that’s tasteless! That means you can add it to almost anything without affecting the taste. Go ahead, sprinkle it on salads, cereal and yogurt or blend it up in your smoothie. (See Mad About Monday 2-6-12

So, what are the health claims? The Aztecs ate chia seeds for energy. It is reported to be mildly anti-inflammatory, slows the digestion of carbohydrates helping to regulate blood sugar, lowers bad and raises good cholesterol, aids in weight loss and helps to control cravings. Because it’s loaded with anti-oxidants it aids in the prevention of heart disease and hypertension and should be included in any anti-aging strategy. It also aids in hydration and is great for your skin

As if all that isn’t enough, unlike flax seed, chia doesn’t need to be ground to get the benefits, making it easier and faster to use; and it doesn’t need careful handling because it doesn’t get rancid due to the high levels of anti-oxidants. I’ve read that you can keep them for two years.

Chia seeds turn liquid into a gel-like substance that surrounds the seed. It makes a fantastic base for a raw pudding. I got the following recipe from rawfoodswitch.com:

1/4c chia seeds, 1.5c almond or other nut milk, dash of vanilla, sweetener of choice (I love pure maple syrup). Put all ingredients in a glass jar, shake to mix and refrigerate overnight … Voila! Pudding!

As a variation, I plan to try adding 1T of raw cacao to the mix … yum!